Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Peanut/Groundnut Mylk Curds/Yogurt HowDo Tutorial


Many new and potential vegans, especially in India, often ask about a plant based replacement for yogurt. Vegan curds can be made with a wide variety of plant mylks - soy, cashew, rice, coconut, almond, oat, peanut/groundnut... Each kind of yogurt has its own consistency and delicious flavour. And all of them have a longer shelf life than the curds made out of animal fluids.

My favourite of the lot, peanut curds, also happens to be the most popular vegan yogurt among vegans and non-vegans alike. Even my traditional, vegetarian grandmothers really enjoy the soothing, creamy taste and texture it offers.

Peanut/Groundnut Mylk Curds/Yogurt

Peanut curds is really versatile. It can be enjoyed straight by the spoonfuls or in the form or good old South Indian curd rice. It can be turned into majjige (buttermilk) or lassi or added into yogurt based dishes like avial, majjige huli, kadhi, raita, etc...

One of the most visited posts on my blog is Creamy Peanut Milk Curds/Yogurt. I wrote that post when I had newly learnt how to make yogurt out of groundnuts.

Today I created a video demonstrating the process step by step so that it'll be easier for everyone to understand.

Watch the clip, if you have any questions, post them as a comment here and I'll reply as soon as possible.

Enjoy! :)

Peanut Mylk Yogurt/Curds.



A few pointers (I've mentioned most of these in my older blog post too):

- You can optionally strain the cooked peanut mylk before turning it into curds. But I prefer to leave the pulp in there.

- I have said "green chilli crowns" as one of the starters but the crowns of any variety of chilli can be used. To learn more about how the chilli crown method works, check out the Cashewnut Curds Recipe on Harini's blog, Tongue Ticklers.

- After making the first batch of curds using any of the starters I mentioned on the HowDo, start saving a spoonful of yogurt from each batch you make to use as a starter for the next batch. The flavour of the curds gets better and better with each generation of the lactobacilli.

- Peanut curds sets well in 8-12 hours (depending on the climate) but let it sit out at room temperature for up to 24 hours if you want it to sour well.

- The yogurt will stay fine in the fridge for 10-15 days at least. I think it might last longer but we usually finish up even our largest batches within two weeks. It's that yum! :)

34 comments:

  1. i love this howdo video!:) so easy and so fun

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  2. will check the clip. still have to try peanut yogurt. till now pretty pleased with cashew yogurt.

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    1. I enjoy cashew yogurt too. It sours better than any other vegan yogurt because of the natural sugars in the cashew. But I love the peanut yogurt flavour and the way it sets beautifully. :)

      Let me know how you like it when you try it out.

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  3. This is a completely new one on me - I've never seen it before, but I really like the idea of making my own yoghurt. Bookingmarking this one for later trying out!

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    1. Joey, do let me know how you like it once you try it out. :)

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  4. If I don't have chill what kind of thing I can put in Yogurt?

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    1. You can put one spoon of any yogurt as the first starter. Then every time save a little bit from the peanut yogurt and use that as the starter for the next batch.

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  5. I've made nut milk yogurts, but this looks even better than my method! Gotta try it!

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    1. Do try and let me know how you like it, girl. :)

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  6. I wonder if the allergens lessen with fermentation process. I'll try this and see if it triggers any allergies which I have with peanuts. Maybe almonds might be an option too, I am much less allergic to it than peanuts and cashews... Great howdo video! :)

    How did the tempeh go?

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    1. I'm not very knowledgeable about how food allergies work, but I do know that because the cultures digest the peanuts duting the fermentation process, the proteins are broken down and the structure is changed. Do try and let me know how it works for you. It would be great if people with nut allergies are able to consume nut yogurts safely. :)

      Almond yogurt doesn't set creamily like this does but it's tasty enough.

      Tempeh turned out super strong. Haha Am going to make another batch soon with a shorter incubation period.

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    2. Your tempeh turned out strong, maybe it's warmer in your region. If it's warmer then it needs less time or you could reduce the amount of starter powder used. I tried with half the amount mentioned and it did create the spores and fermented well.

      Looking forward to see what you make with the tempeh!

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  7. Hi Susmitha,
    I used to be an on and off vegan and have completely turned vegan now after reading an article in Hindu, few weeks back. I love your blog and good to know that you are from bangalore too. Thanks for the really useful post on peanut curd. Have a doubt though..when you stay stream for 30 minutes, is it like how we make idlis. Please clarify.

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  8. Hi Susmitha,
    I used to be an on and off vegan and have completely turned vegan now after reading an article in Hindu, few weeks back. I love your blog and good to know that you are from bangalore too. Thanks for the really useful post on peanut curd. Have a doubt though..when you stay stream for 30 minutes, is it like how we make idlis. Please clarify.

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    1. Hi Priya, yes it's like steaming idli, without the weight on the cooker. You just do the steaming in a rice tray or any vessel that fits into your steamer or cooker.

      Great to know you turned vegan after reading The Hindu's exposé on the dairy industry. :)

      Do join the Vegan Bangalore group if you're on Facbook. There are man vegans here and we have monthly potlucks too.

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    2. Is there actually probiotic created in this?

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    3. Jessica, yes there are probiotic cultures in this. :)

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    4. I am so excited to try this... Will red chili crowns work? I live in Thailand so I'm not sure if the chilies will be the same

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    5. I've never tried the red (dried) chilli crowns myself, but I have friends who have successfully.

      Any kind of chilli crown should work, Jessica. :)

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  9. I tried this today. But the milk coagulated. Any idea why? I have been vegan for a year and a half. I miss yogurt so bad. I really need to get it right.

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    1. Oh peanut mylk doesn't coagulate very easily, I'm surprised to hear this. But even if it has coagulated, it's fine to add starter and curdle it. It'll ferment fine even if the texture is different.

      At what point in the process did it coagulate?

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  10. I really dunno :( I guess I left it for too long. I did the double boiling as it said, stirred like 3 times. At what point do I have to take it out of the water? Also, is it 1/2 cup peanuts to 2.5 litres/2.5 cups of water?

    I threw the milk away :( Didn't know I could use them :( Anyways, I am not quitting what so ever :)

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    1. The double boiling is not a necessity, it just saves some labour. Next time try direct boiling with constant monitoring. Bring it to a rolling boil then lower the heat and let the peanut mylk simmer until you get the cooked peanut smell. About half an hour.

      Also add the starter only after it has come down to lukewarm temperature. If the mylk is too hot when you add the starter, it'll coagulate.

      Good luck! :)

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  11. Am trying it as I type :) hope it turns out well. Will give you a status update soon

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  12. Tried the peanut yogurt out a few times so far. Liked it better when strained. I'd strain the milk and then blend the paste again with some more water to get all the milk out.Tried the steam method but found the direct heating faster. Needed to stir a few times. One batch mysteriously coagulated while boiling. Did I blend it too much? Got the starter with some chilly stems in a cup of peanut milk first.
    Takes a little getting used to the taste. Could I try with some vanilla beans? How would I use the beans, any idea?
    Tx for taking the trouble to make the video, was a great help!

    Darryl

    PS. Tried with soya beans too, but the taste was too strong.

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  13. Wow this looks yum!!!! I am certainly going to try this...your cheese recipe and the Cashew yogurt :-D

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  14. I have a vegan for the past two years. I have been avoiding all the milk and milk based products. Off late I started thinking about the alternatives for milk and curd. Alas ! I land in your article. I am going to make my first vegan curd tomorrow. Wish me best of luck ! ! !

    Thanks for the wonderful video...

    Keep posting new articles :) :)

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  15. Made this for my daughter who is allergic to both dairy and soy products. And was she happy! Thank you for this wonderful recipe!

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    1. So glad to know this was helpful for your daughter, Ramya. :)

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  16. Im just turning vegan. being south Indian and from Blore but situated in Mumbia miss curds, I found your site resourceful. I keep engaging with the vegan group here.
    I have set almond curd today, in the evening I should see, how it is.

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    1. Wish you all the best on your vegan journey, Kausi. Glad you found my blog useful.

      Hope the almond curds turned out delicious. :)

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  17. Hi!
    I tried the peanut curd and got a little strong flavor the first time.
    But the next time VOILA!!! PERFECT TASTE AND CONSISTENCY.
    Thanks a tonn for this video and your inputs.

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